“The Sun Stood Still” – The Language of Men

The Times of Israel relates that, ”

‘Joshua stopped the sun’ 3,224 years ago today, scientists say

Researchers claim epic Biblical story is earliest account of annular eclipse that occurred on October 30, 1207 BCE; also helps pinpoint reigns of Pharaohs Ramesses and Merneptah

The researchers ignore Joshua’s “about a whole day.” and Jasher’s “And there was no day like that, before it or after it, … .”

Jasher 88:64-5 ” … and the sun stood still in the midst of the heavens, and it stood still six and thirty moments, and the moon also stood still and hastened not to go down a whole day. And there was no day like that, before it or after it, … “


Joshua 10:13 “And the sun stood still, and the moon stayed, until the people had avenged themselves upon their enemies. Is not this written in the book of Jasher? So the sun stood still in the midst of heaven, and hasted not to go down about a whole day.”


This can’t be referring to an eclipse, as there is a specific reference to both the sun and moon staying still, whereas the cause of an eclipse is because they move across the sky. A further problem is that the account in Joshua is not even the direct account of the event, but rather a quoting of what was in another story and we don’t have the original story.


The Tehillim (Psalms) 19. states “The heavens declare the Glory of HaShem, […] there is no speech there are no words, neither is their voice heard….” implying that the celestial bodies convey a message about the Greatness of the Creator (Whose WISDOM is unsearchable…) causing mankind to speak about (Praise the Creator) the Greatness of the Creator. This is how our commentators explain Tehillim 19.


The account in Joshua 10 must be interpreted according to the emphatic statement in the Book of Jasher that “the sun stood still for six and thirty moments and the moon did not go down for a whole day.”


Clearly, the Book of Jasher is relating that “there was no day like that, before it or after it, … “; meaning that it was NOT an eclipse. An eclipse is just another proof for what was a one time event; a unique occurrence like the start of the American Revolution, a shot heard across the world! If Joshua were trying to convey a metaphor for an eclipse he would have used the turn of a phrase that would have been understood by his contemporaries. The Jewish Bible speaks in the language of men (conveys ideas in language understood at a given time) so if both Joshua and the author of the Book of Jasher stated that “the sun stood still” (and the moon did not go down for a whole day) they are trying to convey the message that “in the language of men,” the sun did not set or go down.
Now we know that the sun does not “go down” or “set” but that the earth “turns it’s western direction away from the sun” for a period of time. That is, that it is revolving. To say the sun set or the sun went down is merely speaking in the language of men [of observation]. To say that “the sun stood still” is to say that it continued to shine for “six and thirty moments;” or almost completely (six and thirty is a [Biblical] mathematical statement closer to seven which means whole or complete in Biblical mathematics), as in a whole week of seven days.

six and thirty moments in the Book of Jasher is the equivalent of the Book of Joshua’s “about a whole day.”


The Book of Jasher also relates that “and the moon also stood still and hastened not to go down a whole day.” This expresses the opposite of an eclipse! The moon stood still for a whole day; something we don’t find in modern recorded astronomy even though we can observe the moon during the morning hours after “sunrise” and even though we can observe the “Midnight Sun” in the northern latitudes. Again, the language of men…!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s